Will it be a problem to buy fake luxury goods?


Will it be a problem to buy fake luxury goods?

Whenever a new batch of fake designer goods is found, we are all told that those who purchase these products are destroying the brand reputation, stealing income from the company, fostering an unethical labor market and compensating for organized crime. But is this true?
A survey by the BBC found that thousands of replica goods were seized in the black market in England in the past two years.
But what kind of harm will it take to buy a pair of “Louboutins” from the market, or to sell its men’s “Chanel” replica designer handbags from overseas beaches? For the average gambler, it sounds a bit far-fetched and their cash flows directly to drug cartels or gunners.
We are not talking about alcohol, tobacco or drugs – buying these items obviously poses a health risk. This also applies to toys that do not meet safety standards and replica sunglasses that do not have recommended UV protection. Nor are we talking about people who really believe that the goods they are buying are real.
We are talking about commodities that are willing to purchase phase-out products at obsolescence prices. Those who are very clear may have quality and copyright issues – but they don’t really care.
Fake handbags
Someone will sell replica handbags on the market with genuine products?
After all, did anyone who bought replica goods for Tenner really deprived companies of selling hundreds or even thousands of pounds of products? A woman who is impulsively buying on the market will almost certainly not invest in real transactions, and wealthy buyers of genuine brands are proud to understand their differences and have official articles.
Where is the black market hot spot in the UK?
As Batley’s Steven Brown told the BBC’s revelation to England’s black market: “I bought a fake handbag for my wife. We all know that the £20 Gucci bag is fake and not as long as it really is.
This is what David Wald, professor of criminology at the University of Leeds, believes. He said that the issue of replica goods “has caused a lot of anger, but what?”
He believes that there is little evidence that profits provide funds for organized criminal groups – although there are problems with sellers who admit fake goods do not pay taxes.
However, should this be a problem for consumers? Do we have a moral responsibility to ensure that people who buy things pay taxes? Is this our business?
“This is also true for those who steal designs or logos. Fashion is a complex market, and counterfeiting is just as complicated.
Fake luxury goods still need to meet certain standards, otherwise they will not sell. There is still skill in making things that may be confused with originality, and skilled workers still need it.

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